Former Cop Pleads Guilty to Killing Colleague During Russian Roulette

Former St. Louis cop Nathaniel Hendren, 30, pleaded guilty on Friday to fatally shooting his colleague, police officer Kaitlyn Alix, 24. He admits to one count of involuntary manslaughter in the first-degree, and one count of armed criminal action, authorities say. Prosecutors said he killed her during Russian Roulette on January 24, 2019.

The on-duty Hendren and off-duty Alix were in the defendant’s apartment, “dry-firing” with their personal guns, authorities said. He took the cartridges out of his revolver, put one back inside, and spun the cylinder multiple times, prosecutors said. He checked where the cartridge landed. He pulled the trigger while the weapon was pointed down the hallway and the cartridge wasn’t in the “live” position, prosecutors said. According to authorities, Alix took the gun from him, pointed it at him, and pulled the trigger. It didn’t go off. Hendren then took back the revolver, and pulled the trigger while thinking the lone cartridge wasn’t in the active position, prosecutors said. He was wrong. The bullet hit Alix in the chest.

“The reckless behavior that took place that early morning has left an unfillable void for her grieving husband, her parents, and a host of loving family and friends,” said Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner. “Mr. Hendren’s plea admits that his actions were the cause of officer Alix’s death. Although there is nothing that the law can do to restore the life of Officer Alix, it can make sure that the person responsible for her senseless death is held accountable for his careless behavior.”

Hendren was sentenced to seven years for the manslaughter count, concurrent with a three year term for armed criminal action.

[Mugshot via St. Louis County Jail]

via Law & Crime https://lawandcrime.com

March 1, 2020 at 05:28PM

Former ‘Model’ DEA Agent Indicted in Conspiracy

Jose Irizarry, a once-standout federal narcotics agent known for spending lavishly on luxury cars and Tiffany jewelry, has been charged with conspiring to launder money with the same Colombian drug cartel he was supposed to be fighting, the Associated Press reports. Irizarry, 46, and his wife were arrested Friday at their home in Puerto Rico. A 19-count federal indictment accused of “secretly using his position and his special access to information” to divert millions in drug proceeds from control of the Drug Enforcement Administration. “It’s a black eye for the DEA to have one of its own engaged in such a high level of corruption,” said Mike Vigil, former DEA Chief of International Operations. “He jeopardized investigations. He jeopardized other agents and … informants.”

Federal prosecutors in Tampa allege the conspiracy also benefited two unindicted co-conspirators, a Colombian public official and the head of a drug trafficking and money laundering organization who became the godfather to the Irizarry couple’s children in 2015, when the DEA agent was posted to the Colombian city of Cartagena. AP reported last year on Irizarry’s alleged wrongdoing. Before being exposed, Irizarry had been a model agent, winning awards and praise from his supervisors. After joining DEA in 2009, he was entrusted with an undercover money laundering operation using front companies, shell bank accounts and couriers. The case has raised concerns that the conspiracy may have compromised undercover operations. “His fingerprints are all over dozens of arrests and indictments,” said David Weinstein, a former federal prosecutor in Miami. “It could have a ripple effect and cause courts to re-examine any case he was involved in.”

via The Crime Report https://ift.tt/2myW3Gx

February 22, 2020 at 08:18PM

This Week’s Corrupt Cops Stories

A former DEA agent gets popped for helping a Colombian drug trafficker, a former Atlanta-area drug task force member goes to federal prison for stealing and reselling drugs from drug busts, and more. Let’s get to it:

[image:1 align:left caption:true]In San Juan, Puerto Rico, a former DEA special agent was arrested last Friday on charges he used cash seized during undercover drug operations to buy luxury goods, including jewelry, cars, and a house in Cartagena, Colombia, and engaged in money laundering with a Colombian drug trafficker. He is charged with conspiracy to launder money, honest services wire fraud, bank fraud, conspiracy to commit bank fraud, conspiracy to commit identity theft and aggravated identity theft. His wife, who was also arrested, is charged with conspiracy to launder money. His charging indictment accuses him of “engaging in a corrupt scheme” and “enriching himself by secretly using his position and his special access to information to divert drug proceeds from DEA control to the control of himself and his co-conspirators.”

In Cincinnati, a Cincinnati police officer was arrested last Friday on charges she outed an undercover officer to a nightclub owner targeted in a money laundering and drug trafficking investigation, as well as concealing $81,000 in off-duty income. Officer Quianna Campbell, 39, is charged with lying to federal agents and filing false income tax returns.

In North Charleston, South Carolina, a former North Charleston narcotics detective was arrested Tuesday officials said they found he provided information about another agency’s investigations to a person involved in drug activity. Brett Bull, 33, allegedly sent text messages to that person, alerting him to drug operations being planned by the Charleston County Sheriff’s Office and warning him to “stay away.” He is charged withmisconduct in office and obstruction in connection to the incident.

In Atlanta, a former Gwinnet County drug task force member was sentenced Monday to 10 years in federal prison for stealing drugs off the street and then selling them. Antione Riggins, 41, pleaded guilty late last year to drug trafficking He admitted seizing narcotics, including methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine and oxycodone, while creating documents to try to cover up his tracks. In one case, he seized three pounds of cocaine from a high-speed crash, but only logged one into the evidence room. In another incident, Riggins was tasked with transporting 13 pounds of meth from an Atlanta hotel to the evidence room. None of the meth made it there. Three days after that 2017 incident, Riggins made off with more than eight pounds of heroin that were supposed to go to the evidence room.

via Criminal Justice https://ift.tt/2Np9czi

February 27, 2020 at 01:59AM

Florida Cop Under Investigation for Leaking to Newspaper

Police in the Fort Lauderdale, Fl., suburb of Sunrise are weighing whether to charge a sergeant with a felony, not for excessive force or off-the-job misconduct— but for spilling confidential information to the news media, reports the Sun-Sentinel.

The investigation became public in September, when police executed search warrants suspecting Sgt. Roger Krege of providing the South Florida Sun Sentinel in 2014 with, among other things, a list of confidential informants used in dozens of drug cases.

“That is not something you see often,” said Jim Mulvaney, an adjunct professor in the law and police science department at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, specializing in law and police science.

“Internal affairs investigations are fairly common, but leaks don’t usually trigger criminal investigations.”

The timing coincides with a Sun Sentinel investigation called “Cops, Cash and Cocaine,” which outlined how the police department used confidential informants to lure drug buyers into the city. Once the arrests were made, police were able to seize the buyers’ money and often their vehicles, resulting in huge paydays for the officers working overtime and for the informants.

The article showed the newspaper knew the location of the department’s “Vice, Intelligence and Narcotics” unit, which forced Sunrise to move the office. The article did not disclose the name of any confidential informant.

Sunrise Lt. Brian Katz said the leak was taken seriously because it put other members of the force in danger.

“The exposure and illegal copying of the (list) put every confidential informant in grave danger and threatened the personal safety of every detective working in the Vice, Intelligence and Narcotics unit and working with the confidential informants,” said Katz.

In Florida, the charge of “disclosure or use of confidential criminal justice information” is a third-degree felony, punishable by a maximum of five years in prison. The law was passed in 2003.

via The Crime Report https://ift.tt/2myW3Gx

November 5, 2019 at 11:16AM

Broward Sheriff’s Deputy Arrested After Throwing Girl To Floor By Her Neck

A Florida sheriff’s deputy assigned to a school was arrested and charged with felony child abuse after he was caught on video grabbing a 15-year-old girl by the neck and slamming her to the floor.

Broward County Sheriff’s Deputy Willard Miller, 38, surrendered to authorities on Tuesday and was released on $5,000 bond to await trial. If convicted, he faces up to five years in prison.

Miller was working as a school resource officer for Cross Creek School in Pompano Beach on Sept. 25 when surveillance video captured his violent interaction with the female student. The school, about 35 miles north of Miami, serves emotionally and behaviorally disabled students from kindergarten through 12th grade.

A judge allowed Willard Miller to be freed on a $5,000 bond to await trial on a felony child abuse charge. 

CBS Miami

A judge allowed Willard Miller to be freed on a $5,000 bond to await trial on a felony child abuse charge. 

In the video, released by the sheriff’s office, the girl can be seen tapping Miller’s leg with her foot moments before he grabs her by the neck with both his hands and throws her to the floor.

Then he’s seen flipping her over, putting his knee in her back and handcuffing her. The video shows him then pushing her through a doorway, causing her to hit a wall.

The student doesn’t appear to have been seriously hurt. Miller was charged under a child abuse law that specifies “without great bodily harm.”

Miller was removed from his position at the school and placed on administrative leave on Sept. 27. He was suspended without pay on Oct. 28.

Broward County Sheriff Gregory Tony called Miller’s actions “deplorable” during a news conference Tuesday. He applauded school district officials for alerting the sheriff’s office to the deputy’s misconduct.

“It’s embarrassing, OK, when we have one individual that acts outside the confines of the oath that they take, it goes on every news channel, it spreads across the country,” Tony said.

“I’m tired of it,” he continued. “I’m going to fix it and I’m going to hold people accountable.”

Miller’s arrest follows several accusations against  Broward County Sheriff’s Office related to excessive force. A deputy was fired last week for punching a handcuffed man in a hospital bed in January.

Two other deputies are awaiting trial on misdemeanor charges of battery and falsifying police reports after a teen was pepper-sprayed and his head was slammed into the ground outside a McDonald’s in April.

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November 6, 2019 at 11:41AM

This Week’s Corrupt Cops Stories

A Louisiana narc with a pain pill habit goes down, a Texas school resource officer gets caught pilfering pain pills, and more. Let’s get to it:

[image:1 align:left]In Lockhart, Texas, a former Lockhart police officer was arrested Friday for stealing pain pills from a junior high school nurse’s office. Chad Corbitt, who had previously served as the School Resource Officer at Lockhart Junior High School, was charged with theft of a controlled substance from a clinic. He went down after the nurse reported missing pills, and video surveillance showed him entering the office after hours in civilian clothes.

In Las Vegas, Nevada, a Las Vegas Metro Police detective was arrested Saturday after being caught with drugs in his personal vehicle. Detective Joseph Rinetti, 46, who also serves on a US Marshals Task Force, is charged with selling or transporting a controlled substance, destroying and concealing evidence and misconduct of a public officer. He’s out on bail.

In Covington, Louisiana, a former St. Tammany’s Parish narcotics officer was sentenced Wednesday to two years in state prison for alerting drug dealers, including one who was supplying him with oxycodone, that they were the subjects of an undercover operation by the sheriff’s office. Jordan Hollenbeck was convicted of three counts of malfeasance in office.

In Rome, Georgia, a former Hays State Prison guard pleaded guilty Monday to smuggling methamphetamine and other drugs to inmates. Voltaire Peter Pierre admitted smuggling meth, cocaine, marijuana, and other drugs in soup containers and other innocuous containers, with prisoners paying him via a payment app. He copped to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine, crack cocaine, and marijuana and possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine on premises where a minor resides. No sentencing date was provided.

via Criminal Justice https://ift.tt/2Np9czi

October 24, 2019 at 04:41PM

Tennessee Deputy Sued Twice In The Same Day Over A Roadside Anal Search And A Forced Baptism

You’ve got to be a special kind of law enforcement officer to have two lawsuits filed against you in the same day. Hamilton County Deputy Daniel Wilkey is that kind of special. The Tennessee law enforcement officer managed to violate rights against enough people that two of them retained lawyers. This suggests Deputy Wilkey violates rights on a regular basis, but maybe not egregiously enough to merit a lawsuit in every case.

Both cases here are disturbing. And they’re disturbing in very different ways. I’ve never read a civil rights lawsuit against an officer that included claims of a forcible religious experience, but here we are. (h/t Peter Bonilla)

The first lawsuit [PDF], filed by Shandle Riley, alleges that Deputy Wilkey followed her to a friend’s house from a nearby gas station. Once he had (sort of) pulled her over, things got weird quick.

First, Deputy Wilkey claimed Riley was holding meth. To prove this, he engaged in a full body patdown. Then he ordered her to take off her bra and “shake her bra and shirt” to prove she hadn’t stashed any meth there. Riley asked for a female officer to be present during this “search” but the deputy told her the law doesn’t require female cops to search female citizens.

He then asked if she had anything illegal in her car. She said she had a marijuana roach stashed in a pack of cigarettes. At that point, Deputy Wilkey became verbally abusive. Then he decided to strike a deal with the alleged criminal. We’ll go to the lawsuit for that because… well, it offers the driest recounting of a positively insane situation.

Wilkey then approached Plaintiff and asked her if she was “saved” and believed in Jesus Christ.

Plaintiff stated that she believed in Jesus Christ, but that she was not “saved” by her own choice.

Wilkey then told Plaintiff that God was talking to him during the vehicle search, and Wilkey felt the Lord wanted him to baptize the Plaintiff.

Wilkey further told Plaintiff that he felt “the spirit.”

Um. Do what now?

These are words coming from the mouth of a sworn peace officer. And that’s not the end of it. The option given to Riley was to participate in this highly-unconventional baptism presided over by an officer of the law or get thrown into the gaping maw of the criminal justice system with as much force as Deputy Wilkey could muster. If Riley agreed to a baptism, Wilkey said he would only cite her for marijuana possession and speak to the judge on her behalf. Riley complied with Wilkey’s demands, which included grabbing towels from her friends house and following Wilkey’s cruiser out to a nearby lake.

At the lake, Riley and Wilkey were joined by Deputy Jacob Goforth, who did nothing as Wilkey proceeded with the “baptism.”

Wilkey told Plaintiff that Goforth was present because, in order for a baptism to be valid, a witness must “attest” to the ritual.

Wilkey then stripped nearly naked, with only his boxer shorts on.

Wilkey then gave Plaintiff the option to strip too, but Plaintiff declined.

Wilkey then lead Plaintiff into the near waist deep and frigid water, placed one hand on Plaintiff’s back, and his other hand on Plaintiff’s breasts, and completely submerged Plaintiff under the water.

Wilkey held Plaintiff under water for several moments, then with his hands still positioned on her back and breasts, raised Plaintiff from the cold water.

Plaintiff was shivering uncontrollably, and felt horribly violated.

Unfortunately for Riley, I doubt there’s a case on point that will easily eliminate Wilkey’s qualified immunity defense. But hopefully, the court will recognize this is batshit insane enough it doesn’t need to find a case on point to find Wilkey violated her rights. To top it all off, Riley held up her end of the under-the-color-of-law bargain. Deputy Wilkey did not.

At no time did Wilkey ever [go to] court on Plaintiff’s behalf and speak to the judge.

If that was the only thing Wilkey was being sued about, it would be enough to question his fitness for duty. But as you already know, this isn’t the end of the accusations against the deputy.

The second lawsuit, filed in the same court on the same day, alleges Deputy Wilkey engaged in a suspicionless stop that turned into an impromptu roadside anal cavity search and the beating of a handcuffed man. And oh my god does it start with one of the dumbest things an officer has ever said to defend a pretextual stop. From the lawsuit [PDF]:

Wilkey followed Plaintiffs, and conducted a traffic stop of the Plaintiffs on the false claims of “window tint violation” and that he could smell the odor of marijuana as Wilkey followed the plaintiffs.

This assertion of Wilkey’s exceptional olfactory senses is followed by a parade of brutalities inflicted on the passenger of the pulled-over vehicle at the hands of the deputy. Fortunately for the plaintiffs, this whole interaction was recorded.

Here’s the lawsuit’s description of those events:

Wilkey handcuffed James, and the individual Defendants took James to the front of one of their police vehicles.

Wilkey then began to grab James’ genitals. When James told Wilkey that James had an untreated and large hernia and that Wilkey’s actions were causing James pain, Brewer and Wilkey jerked James’ arms high above his back, and slammed James face-down onto the hot engine hood, causing injury to James.

Wilkey and Brewer then beat James with fists, knees, and feet, slammed James to the ground, and continued their brutalization of James.

Wilkey and Brewer then removed James’ pants and shoes, while still beating James.

Wilkey and Brewer then forced James’ face back onto the hot hood of the same police vehicle and continued to jerk his arms high above his back, and beat James.

While Brewer continued to force James’ face back onto the hot hood of the same police vehicle and jerk his arms high above his back Wilkey donned a set of gloves, pulled down James’ underwear, and conducted an anal cavity search of James.

The lawsuit goes on to note that James suffered numerous injuries including “tearing of his anus” and an aggravation of his existing hernia. The charges brought against James (the deputies discovered drugs in his underwear) were all dropped after the dashcam video was made public.

Deputy Wilkey has been suspended, but it’s the nice kind that means he’ll be paid to do nothing while the Sheriff’s Office decides what to do with him. It would seem obvious he’s too expensive to keep around.

Tennessee Deputy Sued Twice In The Same Day Over A Roadside Anal Search And A Forced Baptism

More Law-Related Stories From Techdirt:

States Rush To Protect Net Neutrality On Heels Of Court Ruling
Marc Benioff Calls For Section 230 To Be Abolished At The Same Time His Company Is Relying On 230 To Get Out Of A Lawsuit
The Ultimate Aim Of China’s 2016 Cybersecurity Law Is Now Clear: Nothing Digital Can Be Secret From The Authorities

via Above the Law https://abovethelaw.com

October 18, 2019 at 06:35PM

This Week’s Corrupt Cops Stories

A Georgia narc gets in trouble for his sticky fingers, a Philadelphia narc uses a confiscated Porsche for his stepdaughter’s prom pictures, and more. Let’s get to it:

In Lawrenceville, Georgia, a former Gwinnett County deputy was arrested last Wednesday for allegedly using his position on a federal narcotics task force to steal cocaine and methamphetamine. Antoine Riggins faces federal charges of stealing cocaine and methamphetamine, as well as multiple counts of making false statements to cover up his thefts. Riggins was assigned to transport seized drugs to the evidence vault but would repeatedly take some for himself.

In Philadelphia, a Philadelphia police narcotics officer was arrested last Thursday for using a 2018 Porsche he confiscated during a drug investigation to drive his stepdaughter to take photos for her school prom. James Coolen Jr., 45, is charged with unauthorized use of an automobile and misapplication of entrusted property, both second-class misdemeanors. He resigned from the department last Wednesday to avoid being fired.

In Senath, Missouri, a Senath police officer was arrested last Friday after a traffic stop turned up meth, drug paraphernalia, and a bunch of guns. Officer Freddie Williams, 38, faces one count of class C felony possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute and nine counts of class E felony unlawful use of a weapon. Williams is also the former police chief in Cardwell, Missouri.

In Springville, Alabama, a St. Clair Correctional Facility guard was arrested Tuesday after a work vehicle search found 138 grams of methamphetamine and 16 grams of heroin in his car as he came to work. Ivan Caldwell, 26, is charged with two counts of trafficking in controlled substances, promoting prison contraband, and violation of license to carry a pistol. He has resigned as a correctional officer.

via Criminal Justice https://ift.tt/2Np9czi

October 9, 2019 at 04:51PM

EFF to First Circuit: First Amendment Protects Right to Secretly Audio Record Police

The First Amendment protects the public’s right to use electronic devices to secretly audio record police officers performing their official duties in public. This is according to an amicus brief EFF filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. The case, Martin v. Rollins, was brought by the ACLU of Massachusetts on behalf of plaintiffs who are challenging the constitutionality of the Massachusetts anti-eavesdropping statute, which prohibits the secret audio recording of all conversations, even those that are not private.

The First Circuit had previously held in Glik v. Cunniffe (2011) that Glik had a First Amendment right to record police officers arresting another man in Boston Common. He had used his cell phone to openly record both audio and video of the incident. The court also held that this did not violate the Massachusetts anti-eavesdropping statute.

EFF’s amicus brief argues that people frequently use modern electronic devices to record and share audio and video recordings, especially on social media. These often include newsworthy recordings of fatal police shootings and other police misconduct. Such recordings facilitate police accountability and enhance the public discussion about police use of force and racial disparities in our criminal justice system.

EFF’s amicus brief also argues that audio recordings can be particularly helpful in chronicling police misconduct, providing more context beyond the video images, such as when a bystander audio recorded Eric Garner screaming, “I can’t breathe.” Additionally, being able to secretly audio record police officers performing their official duties in public is critical given that many officers retaliate against civilians who openly record them.

In addition to the First Circuit’s Glik decision, five other federal appellate jurisdictions have upheld a First Amendment right to record police officers performing their official duties in public: the Third, Fifth, Seventh, Ninth, and Eleventh Circuits. EFF wrote an amicus brief in the Third Circuit case, as well as in a pending case in the Tenth Circuit and a case in the Northern District of Texas that focused on the First Amendment right to record emergency medical personnel and other first responders.

The First Circuit reached the right decision in Glik, and we hope the appellate court will take this opportunity to further strengthen the right to record police officers performing their official duties in public by holding that secret audio recording is also protected by the First Amendment.

via EFF.org Updates https://ift.tt/US8QQS

October 7, 2019 at 03:02PM

Miami Police officer accused of crossing the line during DUI arrest

(WSVN) – A Miami Police detective sworn to enforce the law is caught on tape trying to be above the law. Just one station has the dramatic police bodycam videos showing what happened after the detective was pulled over for a suspected DUI. 7’s Kevin Ozebek investigates.

An off-duty City of Miami Police detective in handcuffs, and hoping to catch a break from the law.

Miami Police Detective Danny Hebra: “Sarge, please.”

MCSO deputy: “This is not fun for me, either.”

Danny Hebra: “I know. It’s [expletive] up.”

Monroe County Sheriff’s deputies arrested Miami Police Detective Danny Hebra in July on DUI charges.

MCSO deputy: “You know we have a job to do, right?” (takes Hebra’s badge from belt holder)

Danny Hebra: “No, no. Sarge, sarge.”

MCSO deputy: “Come on, just relax.”

It all began with a 911 call.

Yancy Bartlett (in 911 call): “There’s this guy in a black Tahoe. He’s, like, really drunk, driving over the curbs and everything.”

Yancy Bartlett made that call after he says he saw Hebra park his car in a Key Largo shopping plaza.

Yancy Bartlett: “I was watching him walk there, and he was just like wobbling everywhere, so I figured that he was probably drinking. As he went into the liquor store, I called 911 and told them what was going on.”

Bartlett says Detective Hebra then left the store and sat in his car.

Yancy Bartlett: “He took a bottle, I guess, of vodka and threw the bottle out the window, right onto the ground, and then drove off.”

Moments later, a Monroe County Sheriff’s deputy spotted the Tahoe and followed, watching as Hebra drifted into the bike lane.

After he turned onto a side street into the wrong lane, he pulled him over.

MCSO deputy: “Would you happen to have your registration with you at all?”

Danny Hebra: “Ehh.” (holds his chest)

Hebra seemed to have trouble speaking and told the deputy that he was nervous.

Danny Hebra: “I usually don’t get stopped, so, whew.”

Instead of handing over his registration. he gave his City of Miami Police ID.

Danny Hebra: “Being a police officer, that’s my registration.”

A second deputy arrived and gets filled in on what’s happening.

MCSO deputy: “He does have a firearm on him. When I made contact with him, his eyes are bloodshot. I could smell alcohol coming from the car, and speech is slurred.”

Danny Hebra was ordered to leave his gun in the car and then reluctantly agreed to a roadside sobriety test.

Danny Hebra: “You want to do this?”

MCSO deputy: “I can tell you, from police officer to police officer, Danny, this does not make me feel very comfortable.”

He did start the test, but soon wanted to make a phone call. The police report notes the contact he called was labeled “Sergeant.” In the call, Hebra said he’s “doing roadsides” and asked, “Do I do them?”

Once off the phone, he told the deputy he no longer wanted to continue the test, but he did continue begging to be let off the hook.

Danny Hebra: “There’s nothing you can do? Really?”

MCSO deputy: “I can’t.”

Danny Hebra: “Really? Really?”

MCSO deputy: “Really. If I let you go right now, Danny, you understand I’ll lose my job?”

Danny Hebra: “You won’t.”

MCSO deputy: “One hundred percent.”

The deputies cuffed Hebra and led him into a cruiser. They collected his wallet, police badge and his loaded gun.

MCSO deputy: “Jesus Christ.”

On the way to the police station, Hebra appeared to pass out. Later at the Sheriff’s Office, he refused to take a breathalyzer test and again tried to berate a deputy.

Danny Hebra: “How do you [expletive] arrest an officer? How do you do that?”

MCSO deputy: “We’re not above the law, sir. You know that, right?”

7News sifted through Detective Hebra’s personnel file. In his 12-year career at Miami Police, he has never been given one reprimand.

Danny Hebra: “Sarge, Sarge. Never been stopped before.”

Danny Hebra: “Sarge, I’m going to lose my [expletive] job. Lose it.”

Detective Hebra still has a job, but has been told to stay home while Miami Police conduct an internal investigation.

CONTACT 7INVESTIGATES:
305-627-CLUE
954-921-CLUE
clue@wsvn.com

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September 30, 2019 at 12:16AM